Resilience

The newsletter for the emergency sector from Australian Red Cross Emergency Services

Welcome to Resilience issue 7

In this edition of Resilience we take an overview of the busy summer period: highlighting the importance of the psychosocial and non-tangible impacts of disasters and acknowledging the significance of disaster anniversaries...

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The Port Arthur shootings: twenty years on from the event that changed how we respond to crises

Two decades ago, an unprecedented act of violence rocked Australia to the core. It was an event that shocked Australians far and wide and gave emergency management a set of challenges it had never faced before...

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Disasters in Australia 2015/16: The challenge of responding to a summer of emergencies

This summer has been exceptionally busy for emergency services organisations around the country, perhaps surprising considering there were no disasters on the scale of Black Saturday or the Queensland floods of 2010/11. However, the large number of smaller scale disasters brought its own challenges...

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Natural disasters to cost Australia $33 billion per year by 2050

The Australian Business Roundtable for Disaster Resilience and Safer Communities has published research that shows the economic costs of disasters in Australia are at least 50% greater than previously estimated, and are expected to increase from $9 billion to $33 billion per year by 2050...

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A new future for disaster resilience in Australia

Leading emergency management organisations in Australia have come together to create the Australian Institute for Disaster Resilience. The new initiative aims to transform the country’s approach to disaster management...

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The words we use and the stories we tell: language and communication in disaster management

Communications are a key component of emergency management and the way we communicate can have a direct impact on the actions and perceptions of disaster management. And when it comes to describing the people involved in disasters, the words and language we use can have a direct effect on those affected and how we interact with them...

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Divided by disasters: The long-term effects of short-term separation

Disasters can be one of the most stressful situations a person will have in their lifetime—especially when families are separated in the confusion. Now, new research has shown that just a few hours of separation can affect people for years...

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Tributes and memorials: new research project will help Australia better deal with disaster recovery

The tributes and memorials that follow traumatic events are an important factor in long-term psychological and social recovery. But despite this, no guidance exists to best to plan and manage them. Now, a new research project will help Australia improve how it deals with this very public response to disasters...

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Why psychosocial support matters during disaster recovery

Disasters don’t only just threaten life, limb and property; they also have a significant impact on psychological wellbeing. This can prolong peoples’ ability to recover and rebuild their lives but psychosocial support can help with this hidden cost of disasters...

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